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Algebraic Equations, Inequalities, and Properties
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This lesson is about trying to get students to make connections between ideas about equations, inequalities, and expressions. The lesson is designed to give students opportunities to use mathematical vocabulary for a purpose to describe, discuss, and work with these symbol strings.The idea is for students to start gathering global information by looking at the whole number string rather than thinking only about individual procedures or steps. Hopefully students will begin to see the symbol strings as mathematical objects with their own unique set of attributes. (7th Grade Math)

Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lecture
Lesson Plan
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
Noyce Foundation
Provider Set:
Inside Mathematics
Author:
Disston, Jacob
Date Added:
11/30/2011
Ancient Civilizations of the World
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In this course, the student will study the emergence of the major civilizations of the ancient world, beginning with the Paleolithic Era (about 2.5 million years ago) and finishing with the end of the Middle Ages in fifteenth century A.D. The student will pay special attention to how societies evolved across this expanse of time - from fragmented and primitive agricultural communities to more advanced and consolidated civilizations. By the end of the course, the student will possess a thorough understanding of important overarching social, political, religious, and economic themes in the ancient world, ranging from the emergence of Confucian philosophy in Asia to the fall of imperial Rome. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: Identify and define the world's earliest civilizations, including the Neolithic Revolution, and describe how it shaped the development of these early civilizations; Identify, describe, and compare/contrast the first advanced civilizations in the world - Mesopotamia and Egypt; Identify and describe the emergence of the earliest civilizations in Asia: the Harappan and Aryan societies on the Indian subcontinent and the Shang and Zhou societies in China; Identify and describe the emergence of new philosophies - Daoism and Confucianism - during the Warring States period in China. Identify and describe the subsequent rise of the Qin and Han dynasties; Identify and describe the different periods that characterized ancient Greece - Archaic Greece (or the Greek Dark Ages), classical Greece, and the Hellenistic era; Identify and describe the characteristics of the Roman Kingdom, the Roman Republic, and Imperial Rome; Analyze the emergence of the Mauryan and Gupta empires during the 'classical age' in India; Identify and analyze the Buddhist and Vedic (Hindu) faiths; Identify and describe the rise of civilizations in the Americas, particularly in Meso and South America; Analyze and describe the rise of Islam in the Middle East; Identify and describe the emergence of the Arab caliphate, the Umayyad dynasty, and Abbasid dynasty; Identify and describe the rise and fall of the Byzantine Empire; Identify and analyze key facets of medieval society in Western EuropeĺÎĺĚ_ĺÜthe Catholic Church, feudalism, and the rise of technology and commerce; Analyze and interpret primary-source documents that elucidate the exchanges and advancements made in civilizations across time and space. (History 101)

Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
11/21/2011
Are Random Triangles Acute or Obtuse?
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This learning video deals with a question of geometrical probability. A key idea presented is the fact that a linear equation in three dimensions produces a plane. The video focuses on random triangles that are defined by their three respective angles. These angles are chosen randomly subject to a constraint that they must sum to 180 degrees. An example of the types of in-class activities for between segments of the video is: Ask six students for numbers and make those numbers the coordinates x,y of three points. Then have the class try to figure out how to decide if the triangle with those corners is acute or obtuse.

Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT Blossoms
Author:
Gilbert Strange
Date Added:
06/02/2012
Area and Perimeter
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This lesson is based on the results of a performance task in which we realized that students' understanding of area and perimeter was mostly procedural. Therefore the purpose of this re-engagement lesson was to address student misconceptions and deepen student understanding of area and perimeter. The standards addressed in this lesson involve finding perimeter and area of various shapes, finding the perimeter when given a fixed area, and using a formula in a practical context. Challenges for our students included decoding the language in the problem and proving their thinking. (7th Grade Math)

Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lecture
Lesson Plan
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
Noyce Foundation
Provider Set:
Inside Mathematics
Author:
Villarin, Antoinette
Date Added:
11/30/2011
The Art of Approximation in Science and Engineering: How to Whip Out Answers Quickly
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The purpose of this learning video is to show students how to think more freely about math and science problems. Sometimes getting an approximate answer in a much shorter period of time is well worth the time saved. This video explores techniques for making quick, back-of-the-envelope approximations that are not only surprisingly accurate, but are also illuminating for building intuition in understanding science. This video touches upon 10th-grade level Algebra I and first-year high school physics, but the concepts covered (velocity, distance, mass, etc) are basic enough that science-oriented younger students would understand. If desired, teachers may bring in pendula of various lengths, weights to hang, and a stopwatch to measure period. Examples of in- class exercises for between the video segments include: asking students to estimate 29 x 31 without a calculator or paper and pencil; and asking students how close they can get to a black hole without getting sucked in.

Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT Blossoms
Author:
Stephen M. Hou
Date Added:
06/02/2015
The Art of Approximation in Science and Engineering: How to Whip Out Answers Quickly
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The purpose of this learning video is to show students how to think more freely about math and science problems. Sometimes getting an approximate answer in a much shorter period of time is well worth the time saved. This video explores techniques for making quick, back-of-the-envelope approximations that are not only surprisingly accurate, but are also illuminating for building intuition in understanding science. This video touches upon 10th-grade level Algebra I and first-year high school physics, but the concepts covered (velocity, distance, mass, etc) are basic enough that science-oriented younger students would understand. If desired, teachers may bring in pendula of various lengths, weights to hang, and a stopwatch to measure period. Examples of in- class exercises for between the video segments include: asking students to estimate 29 x 31 without a calculator or paper and pencil; and asking students how close they can get to a black hole without getting sucked in.

Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
MIT Learning International Networks Consortium
Provider Set:
M.I.T. Blossoms
Author:
Stephen M. Hou
Date Added:
06/02/2012
Art of the Islamic World
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This course serves as an introduction to the pre-modern Islamic artistic traditions of the Mediterranean, Near East, and Central and South Asia. It surveys core Islamic beliefs, the basic characteristics of Islamic art and architecture, and art and architecture created under each dynasty and ruling party. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: identify the core beliefs of Islam, the major characteristics of Islamic art, and the major forms of Islamic architecture; identify major pre-modern Islamic works of art and monuments from the Middle East, Northern Africa, Spain, and South Asia; explain how the core beliefs of Islam contributed to the basic characteristics of Islamic art and architecture and the secular art works and architecture of the Islamic world; identify the succeeding dynasties that ruled the Islamic world; explain the important role that the patronage of art and architecture had played in definitions of kingship. (Art History 303)

Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
Lecture Notes
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Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
11/10/2011
Aswaat Arabiyya
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Aswaat Arabiyya is an archive of 245 videos in Arabic, listed by difficulty level and accompanied by glossaries and four worksheets each that focus on every aspect of listening comprehension. Selections come largely from Arabic media, with some cultural presentations by native speakers. Videos cover the entire Arabic-speaking world and include MSA and different dialects. Materials are designed to be used both as in-class activities and homework assignments. Videos can be slowed down.

Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Homework/Assignment
Interactive
Lecture
Provider:
University of Texas at Austin
Date Added:
01/10/2013
The Broken Stick Experiment: Triangles, Random Numbers and Probability
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This learning video is designed to develop critical thinking in students by encouraging them to work from basic principles to solve a puzzling mathematics problem that contains uncertainty. Materials for in-class activities include: a yard stick, a meter stick or a straight branch of a tree; a saw or equivalent to cut the stick; and a blackboard or equivalent. In this video lesson, during in-class sessions between video segments, students will learn among other things: 1) how to generate random numbers; 2) how to deal with probability; and 3) how to construct and draw portions of the X-Y plane that satisfy linear inequalities.

Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT Blossoms
Author:
Richard C. Larson
Date Added:
10/31/2014
Can Earthquakes Be Predicted?
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This learning video uses a simple analog setup to explore why earthquakes are so unpredictable. The setup is simple enough that students should be able to assemble and operate it on their own with a teacher's supervision. The teaching approach used in this module is known as the 5E approach, which stands for Engagement, Exploration, Explanation, Elaboration, and Evaluation. Over the course of this lesson, the basic mechanisms that give rise to the behavior of the simple analog system are explained, and further elaboration helps the students to apply their understanding of the analog system to complex fault systems that cause earthquakes

Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT Blossoms
Author:
Zach Adam
Date Added:
06/11/2012
Catalytic Converter
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This video lesson aims to motivate students about chemistry and to raise their awareness about how chemistry helps in solving certain environmental problems. In this lesson, the air pollution problem created by cars and other vehicles is presented. The lesson will highlight causes of this problem, harmful products from it and possible solutions. There will also be discussion of ways to convert the pollutants produced by burning oil in vehicles into more friendly products.

Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT Blossoms
Author:
Prof. Mohammad El-Khateeb
Date Added:
06/11/2012
Classifying Animals by Appearance Versus DNA Sequence
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The topic of this video module is how to classify animals based on how closely related they are. The main learning objective is that students will learn how to make phylogenetic trees based on both physical characteristics and on DNA sequence. Students will also learn why the objective and quantitative nature of DNA sequencing is preferable when it come to classifying animals based on how closely related they are. Knowledge prerequisites to this lesson include that students have some understanding of what DNA is and that they have a familiarity with the base-pairing rules and with writing a DNA sequence.

Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT Blossoms
Author:
Megan E. Rokop
Date Added:
06/11/2012
Comparing Linear Functions
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The foundation of this lesson is constructing, communicating, and evaluating student-generated tables while making comparisons between three different financial plans. Students are given three different DVD rental plans and asked to analyze each one to see if they could determine when the 3 different DVD plans cost the same amount of money, if ever. (7th/8th Grade Math)

Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lecture
Lesson Plan
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
Noyce Foundation
Provider Set:
Inside Mathematics
Author:
Dimas, Cecilio
Date Added:
11/30/2011
Discovering Medicines, Using Robots and Computers
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Scientists who are working to discover new medicines often use robots to prepare samples of cells, allowing them to test chemicals to identify those that might be used to treat diseases. Students will meet a scientist who works to identify new medicines. She created free software that ''looks'' at images of cells and determines which images show cells that have responded to the potential medicines. Students will learn about how this technology is currently enabling research to identify new antibiotics to treat tuberculosis. Students will complete hands-on activities that demonstrate how new medicines can be discovered using robots and computer software, starring the student as ''the computer.'' In the process, the students learn about experimental design, including positive and negative controls.

Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT Blossoms
Author:
Anne Carpenter
Date Added:
05/07/2015
Fabulous Fractals and Difference Equations
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This learning video introduces students to the world of Fractal Geometry through the use of difference equations. As a prerequisite to this lesson, students would need two years of high school algebra (comfort with single variable equations) and motivation to learn basic complex arithmetic. Ms. Zager has included a complete introductory tutorial on complex arithmetic with homework assignments downloadable here. Also downloadable are some supplemental challenge problems. Time required to complete the core lesson is approximately one hour, and materials needed include a blackboard/whiteboard as well as space for students to work in small groups. During the in-class portions of this interactive lesson, students will brainstorm on the outcome of the chaos game and practice calculating trajectories of different equations.

Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT Blossoms
Author:
Laura Zager
Date Added:
07/12/2014
Fabulous Fractals and Difference Equations
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This learning video introduces students to the world of Fractal Geometry through the use of difference equations. As a prerequisite to this lesson, students would need two years of high school algebra (comfort with single variable equations) and motivation to learn basic complex arithmetic. Ms. Zager has included a complete introductory tutorial on complex arithmetic with homework assignments downloadable here. Also downloadable are some supplemental challenge problems. Time required to complete the core lesson is approximately one hour, and materials needed include a blackboard/whiteboard as well as space for students to work in small groups. During the in-class portions of this interactive lesson, students will brainstorm on the outcome of the chaos game and practice calculating trajectories of different equations.

Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
MIT Learning International Networks Consortium
Provider Set:
M.I.T. Blossoms
Author:
Laura Zager
Date Added:
06/02/2012
The Flaws of Averages
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This learning video presents an introduction to the Flaws of Averages using three exciting examples: the ''crossing of the river'' example, the ''cookie'' example, and the ''dance class'' example. Averages are often worthwhile representations of a set of data by a single descriptive number. The objective of this module, however, is to simply point out a few pitfalls that could arise if one is not attentive to details when calculating and interpreting averages. The essential prerequisite knowledge for this video lesson is the ability to calculate an average from a set of numbers. During this video lesson, students will learn about three flaws of averages: (1) The average is not always a good description of the actual situation, (2) The function of the average is not always the same as the average of the function, and (3) The average depends on your perspective. To convey these concepts, the students are presented with the three real world examples mentioned above.

Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT Blossoms
Author:
Daniel Livengood
MIT BLOSSOMS
Rhonda Jordan
Date Added:
06/02/2012
Flu Math Games
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This video lesson shows students that math can play a role in understanding how an infectious disease spreads and how it can be controlled. During this lesson, students will see and use both deterministic and probabilistic models and will learn by doing through role-playing exercises. The primary exercises between video segments of this lesson are class-intensive simulation games in which members of the class 'infect' each other under alternative math modeling assumptions about disease progression. Also there is an occasional class discussion and local discussion with nearby classmates.

Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT Blossoms
Author:
Mai Perches
Richard C. Larson
Sahar Hashmi
Date Added:
07/12/2014
Flu Math Games
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This video lesson shows students that math can play a role in understanding how an infectious disease spreads and how it can be controlled. During this lesson, students will see and use both deterministic and probabilistic models and will learn by doing through role-playing exercises. The primary exercises between video segments of this lesson are class-intensive simulation games in which members of the class 'infect' each other under alternative math modeling assumptions about disease progression. Also there is an occasional class discussion and local discussion with nearby classmates.

Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
MIT Learning International Networks Consortium
Provider Set:
M.I.T. Blossoms
Author:
Mai Perches
Richard C. Larson
Sahar Hashmi
Date Added:
06/02/2012
Free Fall
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This video lesson is an example of ''teaching for understanding'' in lieu of providing students with formulas for determining the height of a dropped (or projected) object at any time during its fall. The concept presented here of creating a chart to organize and analyze data collected in a simple experiment is broadly useful. During the classroom breaks in this video, students will enjoy timing objects in free fall and balls rolling down ramps as a way of learning how to carefully conduct experiments and analyze the results. The beauty of this lesson is the simplicity of using only the time it takes for an object dropped from a measured height to strike the ground. There are no math prerequisites for this lesson and no needed supplies, other than a blackboard and chalk. It can be completed in one 50-60-minute classroom period.

Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
MIT Learning International Networks Consortium
Provider Set:
M.I.T. Blossoms
Author:
John Bookston
Date Added:
06/02/2012
General Chemistry I
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This survey chemistry course is designed to introduce students to the world of chemistry. In this course, we will study chemistry from the ground up, learning the basics of the atom and its behavior. We will apply this knowledge to understand the chemical properties of matter and the changes and reactions that take place in all types of matter. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: Define the general term 'chemistry.' Distinguish between the physical and chemical properties of matter. Distinguish between mixtures and pure substances. Describe the arrangement of the periodic table. Perform mathematical operations involving significant figures. Convert measurements into scientific notation. Explain the law of conservation of mass, the law of definite composition, and the law of multiple proportions. Summarize the essential points of Dalton's atomic theory. Define the term 'atom.' Describe electron configurations. Draw Lewis structures for molecules. Name ionic and covalent compounds using the rules for nomenclature of inorganic compounds. Explain the relationship between enthalpy change and a reaction's tendency to occur. (Chemistry 101; See also: Biology 105. Mechanical Engineering 004)

Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Textbook
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
11/16/2011
Guess the Last Ball
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This video lesson uses the technique of induction to show students how to analyze a seemingly random occurrence in order to understand it through the development of a mathematical model. Using the medium of a simple game, Dr. Lodhi demonstrates how students can first apply the 'rules' to small examples of the game and then, through careful observation, can begin to see the emergence of a possible pattern. Students will learn that they can move from observing a pattern to proving that their observation is correct by the development of a mathematical model. Dr. Lodhi provides a second game for students in the Teacher Guide downloadable on this page. There are no prerequisites for this lesson and needed materials include only a blackboard and objects of two different varieties - such as plain and striped balls, apples and oranges, etc. The lesson can be completed in a 50-minute class period.

Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
MIT Learning International Networks Consortium
Provider Set:
M.I.T. Blossoms
Author:
Fakhar Lohdi
Date Added:
06/02/2012
Human Rights
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"All human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights." This is what it says in the very first Article of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The idea of Human Rights is one of the most important fundaments of human co-existence. At the same time human rights are subject to fierce debates and Human Rights violations are common all over the world.But what exactly are Human Rights? Who is responsible for protecting them? And do they really apply to all people? These are the question the newest animated Video clip in the WissensWerte series deals with.

Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
edeos - digital education
Provider Set:
Individual Authors
Date Added:
11/02/2012
Ilkhanid Mihrab
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This art history video discussion examines the "Mihrab" (prayer niche), 1354--55 (A.H. 755), just after the Ilkhanid period, Isfahan, Iran, polychrome glazed tiles, 135-1/16 x 113-11/16 inches / 343.1 x 288.7 cm (Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York).

Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Lecture
Provider:
Khan Academy
Provider Set:
Smarthistory
Author:
Beth Harris
Steven Zucker
Date Added:
11/16/2012
Is Bigger Better? A Look at a Selection Bias that Is All Around Us
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This learning video addresses a particular problem of selection bias, a statistical bias in which there is an error in choosing the individuals or groups to make broader inferences. Rather than delve into this broad topic via formal statistics, we investigate how it may appear in our everyday lives, sometimes distorting our perceptions of people, places and events, unless we are careful. When people are picked at random from two groups of different sizes, most of those selected usually come from the bigger group. That means we will hear more about the experience of the bigger group than that of the smaller one. This isn't always a bad thing, but it isn't always a good thing either. Because big groups ''speak louder,'' we have to be careful when we write mathematical formulas about what happened in the two groups. We think about this issue in this video, with examples that involve theaters, buses, and lemons. The prerequisite for this video lesson is a familiarity with algebra. It will take about one hour to complete, and the only materials needed are a blackboard and chalk.

Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT Blossoms
Author:
Anna Teytelman
Arnold Barnett
MIT BLOSSOMS
Date Added:
06/02/2012
Islam, The Middle East, and The West
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This course will introduce the student to the history of the Middle East from the rise of Islam to the twenty-first century. The course will emphasize the encounters and exchanges between the Islamic world and the West. By the end of the course, the student will understand how Islam became a sophisticated and far-reaching civilization and how conflicts with the West shaped the development of the Middle East from the medieval period to the present day. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: identify and describe the nature of pre-Islamic society, culture, and religion. They will also be able to describe the subsequent rise of the prophet Muhammad and his monotheistic religion, Islam; identify and describe the elements of Islamic law, religious texts and practices, and belief systems; identify and describe the rise of the Umayyad and Abbasid dynasties in the Middle East. Students will also be able to compare and contrast the two empires; identify and describe the emergence of the Umayyad dynasty in Spain. Students will also be able to analyze the conflicts between Muslims and Christians on the Iberian Peninsula; identify and describe the Crusades. They will be able to describe both Muslim and Christian perceptions of the holy wars; identify and describe the impact of the Mongol invasions on the Middle East; compare and contrast the Ottoman and Safavid empires; analyze the decline of the Ottoman Empire and the beginning of European imperialism/domination of the Middle East in the 1800s; identify and describe how and why European powers garnered increased spheres of influence after the collapse of the Ottoman Empire and the end of World War I; analyze and describe the rise of resistance and independence movements in the Middle East; identify and describe the rise of Islamic nationalism and the emergence of violent anti-Western sentiment; analyze (and synthesize) the relationship between the Middle East and the West between the 600s and the present day; analyze and interpret primary source documents that elucidate the exchanges and conflicts between the Islamic world and the West over time. (History 351)

Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Textbook
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
11/21/2011
Malala: Standing Up For Girls
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This lesson focuses on the story of Malala Yousafzai, a 14-year-old Pakistani girl whose public stance in favor of the education of girls made her the target of a Taliban assassination attempt in October 2012. The lesson has students learn a little about Pakistan, and read and discuss Malala's blog. Because the context of the story is important and complex, background information is provided.

Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lecture
Lesson Plan
Simulation
Provider:
Morningside Center for Teaching Social Responsibility
Provider Set:
Teachable Moment
Date Added:
10/26/2012
Methods for Protein Purification
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This Protein Purification video lesson is intended to give students some insight into the process and tools that scientists and engineers use to explore proteins. It is designed to extend the knowledge of students who are already somewhat sophisticated and who have a good understanding of basic biology. The question that motivates this lesson is, ''what makes two cell types different?'' and this question is posed in several ways. Such scientific reasoning raises the experimental question: how could you study just a subset of specialized proteins that distinguish one cell type from another? Two techniques useful in this regard are considered in the lesson.

Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT Blossoms
Author:
Natalie Kuldell, PhD
Date Added:
06/16/2015
Modern Middle East and Southwest Asia
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This course will introduce the student to the history of the nations and peoples of the Middle East and Southwest Asia from 1919 to the present. The course covers the major political, economic, and social changes that took place throughout the region during this 100-year period. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: Identify and explain major political, social and economic trends, events, and people in history of the Middle East and Southwest Asia from the beginning of the 20th century to the present; Explain how the countries of the region have overcome significant social, economic, and political problems as they have grown from weak former colonies into modern nation-states; Identify and explain the emergence of nationalist movements following World War I, European political and economic imperialism during the first half of the 20th century, the creation of the nation of Israel, regional economic development, and the impact of secular and religious trends on Middle Eastern society and culture during the second half of the 20th century; Identify and explain the important economic, political, and social developments in the Middle East and Southwest Asia during the twentieth and twenty-first centuries; Analyze and interpret primary source documents from the 20th and 21st centuries that illustrate important overarching political, economic, and social themes. (History 232)

Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
11/21/2011
Multiple Representations of Numeric Patterning
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This lesson is a re-engagement lesson designed for learners to revisit a problem-solving task they have already experienced. Students will activate prior knowledge of graphical representations through the 'what's my rule' number talk; compare and contrast two different learners' interpretations of the growing pattern; use multiple representations to demonstrate how one of these learners would represent the numeric pattern; make connections between the different representations to more critically compare the two interpretations. (5th/6th Grade Math)

Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lecture
Lesson Plan
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
Noyce Foundation
Provider Set:
Inside Mathematics
Author:
Dickinson, Fran
Date Added:
11/30/2011
The Physics of Pool
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The objective of this lesson is to illustrate how a common everyday experience (such as playing pool) can often provide a learning moment. In the example chosen, we use the game of pool to help explain some key concepts of physics. One of these concepts is the conservation of linear momentum since conservation laws play an extremely important role in many aspects of physics. The idea that a certain property of a system is maintained before and after something happens is quite central to many principles in physics and in the pool example, we concentrate on the conservation of linear momentum. The latter half of the video looks at angular momentum and friction, examining why certain objects roll, as opposed to slide. We do this by looking at how striking a ball with a cue stick at different locations produces different effects.

Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT Blossoms
Author:
Joseph A. Formaggio
Date Added:
06/02/2012
Properties of Quadrilaterals
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This lesson is about properties of quadrilaterals and learning to investigate, formulate, conjecture, justify, and ultimately prove mathematical theorems. Students will: Analyze characteristics and properties of two- and three-dimensional geometric shapes; develop mathematical arguments about geometric relationships; and apply appropriate techniques, tools, and formulas to determine measurements.Explore relationships among classes of two- and three-dimensional geometric objects, make and test conjectures about them, and solve problems involving them. Employ forms of mathematical reasoning and proof appropriate to the solution of the problem at hand, including deductive and inductive reasoning, making and testing conjectures, and using counter examples and indirect proof. Identify, formulate and confirm conjectures. Establish the validity of geometric conjectures using deduction, prove theorems, and critique arguments made by others. (9th/10th Grade Math)

Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lecture
Lesson Plan
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
Noyce Foundation
Provider Set:
Inside Mathematics
Author:
Humphreys, Cathy
Date Added:
11/30/2011
Proportions and Ratios
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This lesson is about ratios and proportions using candy boxes as well as a recipe for making candy as situations to be considered. It addresses many Mathematical Reasoning standards and asks students to: Use models to understand fractions and to solve ratio problems; think about a ratio as part/part model and to think about the pattern growing in equal groups or a unit composed of the sum of the parts; find a scale factor and apply it to a ratio. (5th Grade Math)

Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lecture
Lesson Plan
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
Noyce Foundation
Provider Set:
Inside Mathematics
Author:
Lewis-Wolfsen, Hillary
Date Added:
11/30/2011
Pythagoras and the Juice Seller
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This video lesson presents a real world problem that can be solved by using the Pythagorean theorem. The problem faces a juice seller daily. He has equilateral barrels with equal heights and he always tries to empty the juice of two barrels into a third barrel that has a volume equal to the sum of the volumes of the two barrels. This juice seller wants to find a simple way to help him select the right barrel without wasting time, and without any calculations - since he is ignorant of Mathematics. The prerequisite for this lesson includes knowledge of the following: the Pythagorean theorem; calculation of a triangles area knowing the angle between its two sides; cosine rule; calculation of a circle's area; and calculation of the areas and volumes of solids with regular bases.

Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT Blossoms
Author:
Ghada Sulaiman Abdullah Marmash
Date Added:
06/02/2012
Quadratic Functions
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This lesson focuses on students making decisions about what tools to apply to solve different problems related to quadratic expressions and equations. It is also intended to build awareness of the form an answer will take in order to help students make sense of the kind of problem they are solving. (9th/10th/11th Grade Math)

Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lecture
Lesson Plan
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
Noyce Foundation
Provider Set:
Inside Mathematics
Author:
Shreve, Barbara
Date Added:
11/30/2011
Qur'an Transliteration
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This site offers 18 instructional videos, divided into 4 levels, that are aimed at enabling users to read Arabic, and specifically Qur'anic Arabic. The video series begins by introducing viewers to the Arabic characters, taking great care to demonstrate the sounds they make and ends with guiding viewers through Qur'anic passages.

Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
transliteration.org
Date Added:
10/14/2013
Revolution in Egypt and the Middle East
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This seminar discusses the revolution in Egypt and the Middle East, specifically: 1) Events in Egypt and how they relate to politics in Africa and South Africa, 2) Events that led to the revolt in Egypt, 3) Egypt and political communication, as well as personal reflections by Dr. Ibrahim Saleh, 4) Role of islam and politics of the Muslim Brotherhood.

Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
University of Cape Town
Provider Set:
UCT OpenContent
Author:
Dr. Ibrahim Saleh
Dr. Pallo Jordan
Dr. Shamil Jeppie
Professor Abdulkader Tayob
Date Added:
02/18/2011
Roots, Shoots, and Wood
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The topic of photosynthesis is a fundamental concept in biology, chemistry, and earth science. Educational studies have found that despite classroom presentations, most students retain their naive idea that a plant's mass is mostly derived from the soil, and not from the air. To call students' attention to this misconception, at the beginning of this lesson we will provide a surprising experimental result so that students will confront their mental mistake. Next, we will help students better envision photosynthesis by modeling where the atoms come from in this important process that produces food for the planet. This lesson can be completed in 50-60 minutes, with the students working on in-class activities during 20-25 minutes of the lesson. As a prerequisite, students need an introductory lesson on photosynthesis, something that includes the overall chemical equation. If students have already studied the intracellular photosynthetic process in detail, this video can still be very helpful because students often miss the big picture about photosynthesis. Materials needed include red, white and black LEGO bricks (described in downloadable hand-out) or strips of red, white and black paper plus paper clips (directions provided in downloadable hand-out). In addition to class discussions, the major in-class activity of this video involves the students' modeling with LEGO bricks or colored paper where the atoms come from in photosynthesis.

Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT Blossoms
Author:
Kathleen M. Vandiver
Date Added:
09/09/2015