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  • Chris Malley
Buoyancy (AR)
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When will objects float and when will they sink? Learn how buoyancy works with blocks. Arrows show the applied forces, and you can modify the properties of the blocks and the fluid.

Material Type:
Simulation
Provider:
University of Colorado Boulder
Provider Set:
PhET Interactive Simulations
Author:
Archie Paulson
Carl Wieman
Chris Malley
Jonathan Olson
Kathy Perkins
Kelly Lancaster
Noah Podolefsky
Patricia Loblein
Sam Reid
Wendy Adams
Date Added:
10/01/2010
Density (AR)
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

Why do objects like wood float in water? Does it depend on size? Create a custom object to explore the effects of mass and volume on density. Can you discover the relationship? Use the scale to measure the mass of an object, then hold the object under water to measure its volume. Can you identify all the mystery objects?

Material Type:
Simulation
Provider:
University of Colorado Boulder
Provider Set:
PhET Interactive Simulations
Author:
Archie Paulson
Carl Wieman
Chris Malley
Jonathan Olson
Kathy Perkins
Kelly Lancaster
Noah Podolefsky
Patricia Loblein
Sam Reid
Wendy Adams
Date Added:
09/01/2010
Double Wells and Covalent Bonds
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

Explore tunneling splitting in double well potentials. This classic problem describes many physical systems, including covalent bonds, Josephson junctions, and two-state systems such as spin 1/2 particles and ammonia molecules.

Material Type:
Simulation
Provider:
University of Colorado Boulder
Provider Set:
PhET Interactive Simulations
Author:
Carl Wieman
Chris Malley
Kathy Perkins
Sam McKagan
Date Added:
10/04/2006
Faraday's Electromagnetic Lab
Unrestricted Use
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Rating

Play with a bar magnet and coils to learn about Faraday's law. Move a bar magnet near one or two coils to make a light bulb glow. View the magnetic field lines. A meter shows the direction and magnitude of the current. View the magnetic field lines or use a meter to show the direction and magnitude of the current. You can also play with electromagnets, generators and transformers!

Material Type:
Simulation
Provider:
University of Colorado Boulder
Provider Set:
PhET Interactive Simulations
Author:
Archie Paulson
Carl Wieman
Chris Malley
Danielle Harlow
Kathy Perkins
Michael Dubson
Date Added:
10/22/2006
Fourier: Making Waves (AR)
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

Learn how to make waves of all different shapes by adding up sines or cosines. Make waves in space and time and measure their wavelengths and periods. See how changing the amplitudes of different harmonics changes the waves. Compare different mathematical expressions for your waves.

Material Type:
Simulation
Provider:
University of Colorado Boulder
Provider Set:
PhET Interactive Simulations
Author:
Carl Wieman
Chris Malley
Danielle Harlow
Sam McKagan
Date Added:
07/01/2005
Generator
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

Generate electricity with a bar magnet! Discover the physics behind the phenomena by exploring magnets and how you can use them to make a bulb light.

Material Type:
Simulation
Provider:
University of Colorado Boulder
Provider Set:
PhET Interactive Simulations
Author:
Archie Paulson
Carl Wieman
Chris Malley
Danielle Harlow
Kathy Perkins
Michael Dubson
Date Added:
04/01/2008
Gravity and Orbits (AR)
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

Move the sun, earth, moon and space station to see how it affects their gravitational forces and orbital paths. Visualize the sizes and distances between different heavenly bodies, and turn off gravity to see what would happen without it!

Material Type:
Simulation
Provider:
University of Colorado Boulder
Provider Set:
PhET Interactive Simulations
Author:
Chris Malley
Emily Moore
John Blanco
Jon Olson
Kathy Perkins
Noah Podolefsky
Patricia Loblein
Sam Reid
Date Added:
02/07/2011
Magnet and Compass
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

Ever wonder how a compass worked to point you to the Arctic? Explore the interactions between a compass and bar magnet, and then add the earth and find the surprising answer! Vary the magnet's strength, and see how things change both inside and outside. Use the field meter to measure how the magnetic field changes.

Material Type:
Simulation
Provider:
University of Colorado Boulder
Provider Set:
PhET Interactive Simulations
Author:
Archie Paulson
Carl Wieman
Chris Malley
Danielle Harlow
Kathy Perkins
Michael Dubson
Date Added:
01/23/2011
Magnets and Electromagnets
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

Explore the interactions between a compass and bar magnet. Discover how you can use a battery and wire to make a magnet! Can you make it a stronger magnet? Can you make the magnetic field reverse?

Material Type:
Simulation
Provider:
University of Colorado Boulder
Provider Set:
PhET Interactive Simulations
Author:
Archie Paulson
Carl Wieman
Chris Malley
Danielle Harlow
Kathy Perkins
Michael Dubson
Date Added:
12/02/2010
Models of the Hydrogen Atom
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

How did scientists figure out the structure of atoms without looking at them? Try out different models by shooting light at the atom. Check how the prediction of the model matches the experimental results.

Material Type:
Simulation
Provider:
University of Colorado Boulder
Provider Set:
PhET Interactive Simulations
Author:
Carl Wieman
Chris Malley
Kathy Perkins
Michael Dubson
Mindy Gratny
Sam McKagan
Wendy Adams
Date Added:
01/01/2007
Molecular Motors (AR)
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

Discover what controls how fast tiny molecular motors in our body pull through a single strand of DNA. How hard can the motor pull in a tug of war with the optical tweezers? Discover what helps it pull harder. Do all molecular motors behave the same?

Material Type:
Simulation
Provider:
University of Colorado Boulder
Provider Set:
PhET Interactive Simulations
Author:
Chris Malley
Kathy Perkins
Meredith Betterton
Michael Dubson
Thomas Perkins
Wendy Adams
Date Added:
12/01/2007
Optical Tweezers and Applications (AR)
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

Did you ever imagine that you can use light to move a microscopic plastic bead? Explore the forces on the bead or slow time to see the interaction with the laser's electric field. Use the optical tweezers to manipulate a single strand of DNA and explore the physics of tiny molecular motors. Can you get the DNA completely straight or stop the molecular motor?

Material Type:
Simulation
Provider:
University of Colorado Boulder
Provider Set:
PhET Interactive Simulations
Author:
Archie Paulson
Chris Malley
Kathy Perkins
Michael Dubson
Thomas Perkins
Wendy Adams
Date Added:
08/01/2007
Quantum Bound States
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

Explore the properties of quantum "particles" bound in potential wells. See how the wave functions and probability densities that describe them evolve (or don't evolve) over time.

Material Type:
Simulation
Provider:
University of Colorado Boulder
Provider Set:
PhET Interactive Simulations
Author:
Carl Wieman
Chris Malley
Kathy Perkins
Sam McKagan
Date Added:
10/02/2006
Rutherford Scattering (AR)
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

How did Rutherford figure out the structure of the atom without being able to see it? Simulate the famous experiment in which he disproved the Plum Pudding model of the atom by observing alpha particles bouncing off atoms and determining that they must have a small core.

Material Type:
Simulation
Provider:
University of Colorado Boulder
Provider Set:
PhET Interactive Simulations
Author:
Carl Wieman
Chris Malley
Kathy Perkins
Michael Dubson
Sam McKagan
Wendy Adams
Date Added:
03/02/2011
Stretching DNA (AR)
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

Explore stretching just a single strand of DNA using optical tweezers or fluid flow. Experiment with the forces involved and measure the relationship between the stretched DNA length and the force required to keep it stretched. Is DNA more like a rope or like a spring?

Material Type:
Simulation
Provider:
University of Colorado Boulder
Provider Set:
PhET Interactive Simulations
Author:
Chris Malley
Kathy Perkins
Meredith Betterton
Michael Dubson
Thomas Perkins
Wendy Adams
Date Added:
12/01/2007
pH Scale (AR)
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

Test the pH of things like coffee, spit, and soap to determine whether each is acidic, basic, or neutral. Visualize the relative number of hydroxide ions and hydronium ions in solution. Switch between logarithmic and linear scales. Investigate whether changing the volume or diluting with water affects the pH. Or you can design your own liquid!

Material Type:
Simulation
Provider:
University of Colorado Boulder
Provider Set:
PhET Interactive Simulations
Author:
Archie Paulson
Chris Malley
Jack Barbera
Kathy Perkins
Laurie Landgon
Patricia Loblein
Wendy Adams
Date Added:
07/02/2012