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Battery-Resistor Circuit
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
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Look inside a resistor to see how it works. Increase the battery voltage to make more electrons flow though the resistor. Increase the resistance to block the flow of electrons. Watch the current and resistor temperature change.

Material Type:
Simulation
Provider:
University of Colorado Boulder
Provider Set:
PhET Interactive Simulations
Author:
Carl Wieman
Sam Reid
Date Added:
11/20/2008
مختبر فاراداي الكهرومغناطيسي
Conditions of Use:
بلا تقييدات
Rating

العب بقضيب مغناطيسي وبلفائف لمعرفة المزيد عن قانون فاراداي. قم بتحريك شريط مغناطيسي بالقرب من واحد أو اثنين من اللفائف لجعل المصباح الكهربائي يتوهج. يظهرالمتر الاتجاه وشدة التيار. شاهد خطوط المجال المغناطيسي أو استخدم المترلاظهار الاتجاه وشدة التيار. يمكنك أيضا اللعب في المغناطيسات الكهربائية, المولدات والمحولات!

نوع المادة:
محاكاة
Provider:
University of Colorado Boulder
Provider Set:
المحاكاة التفاعلية لموقع PhET
المؤلف:
Archie Paulson
Carl Wieman
Chris Malley
Danielle Harlow
Kathy Perkins
Michael Dubson
Date Added:
10/22/2006
The Flaws of Averages
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

This learning video presents an introduction to the Flaws of Averages using three exciting examples: the ''crossing of the river'' example, the ''cookie'' example, and the ''dance class'' example. Averages are often worthwhile representations of a set of data by a single descriptive number. The objective of this module, however, is to simply point out a few pitfalls that could arise if one is not attentive to details when calculating and interpreting averages. The essential prerequisite knowledge for this video lesson is the ability to calculate an average from a set of numbers. During this video lesson, students will learn about three flaws of averages: (1) The average is not always a good description of the actual situation, (2) The function of the average is not always the same as the average of the function, and (3) The average depends on your perspective. To convey these concepts, the students are presented with the three real world examples mentioned above.

Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT Blossoms
Author:
Daniel Livengood
MIT BLOSSOMS
Rhonda Jordan
Date Added:
06/02/2012
Is Bigger Better? A Look at a Selection Bias that Is All Around Us
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
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This learning video addresses a particular problem of selection bias, a statistical bias in which there is an error in choosing the individuals or groups to make broader inferences. Rather than delve into this broad topic via formal statistics, we investigate how it may appear in our everyday lives, sometimes distorting our perceptions of people, places and events, unless we are careful. When people are picked at random from two groups of different sizes, most of those selected usually come from the bigger group. That means we will hear more about the experience of the bigger group than that of the smaller one. This isn't always a bad thing, but it isn't always a good thing either. Because big groups ''speak louder,'' we have to be careful when we write mathematical formulas about what happened in the two groups. We think about this issue in this video, with examples that involve theaters, buses, and lemons. The prerequisite for this video lesson is a familiarity with algebra. It will take about one hour to complete, and the only materials needed are a blackboard and chalk.

Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT Blossoms
Author:
Anna Teytelman
Arnold Barnett
MIT BLOSSOMS
Date Added:
06/02/2012