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Are Random Triangles Acute or Obtuse?
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This learning video deals with a question of geometrical probability. A key idea presented is the fact that a linear equation in three dimensions produces a plane. The video focuses on random triangles that are defined by their three respective angles. These angles are chosen randomly subject to a constraint that they must sum to 180 degrees. An example of the types of in-class activities for between segments of the video is: Ask six students for numbers and make those numbers the coordinates x,y of three points. Then have the class try to figure out how to decide if the triangle with those corners is acute or obtuse.

Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT Blossoms
Author:
Gilbert Strange
Date Added:
06/02/2012
Catalytic Converter
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This video lesson aims to motivate students about chemistry and to raise their awareness about how chemistry helps in solving certain environmental problems. In this lesson, the air pollution problem created by cars and other vehicles is presented. The lesson will highlight causes of this problem, harmful products from it and possible solutions. There will also be discussion of ways to convert the pollutants produced by burning oil in vehicles into more friendly products.

Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT Blossoms
Author:
Prof. Mohammad El-Khateeb
Date Added:
06/11/2012
Classifying Animals by Appearance Versus DNA Sequence
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The topic of this video module is how to classify animals based on how closely related they are. The main learning objective is that students will learn how to make phylogenetic trees based on both physical characteristics and on DNA sequence. Students will also learn why the objective and quantitative nature of DNA sequencing is preferable when it come to classifying animals based on how closely related they are. Knowledge prerequisites to this lesson include that students have some understanding of what DNA is and that they have a familiarity with the base-pairing rules and with writing a DNA sequence.

Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT Blossoms
Author:
Megan E. Rokop
Date Added:
06/11/2012
Faraday's Electromagnetic Lab
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

Play with a bar magnet and coils to learn about Faraday's law. Move a bar magnet near one or two coils to make a light bulb glow. View the magnetic field lines. A meter shows the direction and magnitude of the current. View the magnetic field lines or use a meter to show the direction and magnitude of the current. You can also play with electromagnets, generators and transformers!

Material Type:
Simulation
Provider:
University of Colorado Boulder
Provider Set:
PhET Interactive Simulations
Author:
Archie Paulson
Carl Wieman
Chris Malley
Danielle Harlow
Kathy Perkins
Michael Dubson
Date Added:
10/22/2006
The Flaws of Averages
Conditions of Use:
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This learning video presents an introduction to the Flaws of Averages using three exciting examples: the ''crossing of the river'' example, the ''cookie'' example, and the ''dance class'' example. Averages are often worthwhile representations of a set of data by a single descriptive number. The objective of this module, however, is to simply point out a few pitfalls that could arise if one is not attentive to details when calculating and interpreting averages. The essential prerequisite knowledge for this video lesson is the ability to calculate an average from a set of numbers. During this video lesson, students will learn about three flaws of averages: (1) The average is not always a good description of the actual situation, (2) The function of the average is not always the same as the average of the function, and (3) The average depends on your perspective. To convey these concepts, the students are presented with the three real world examples mentioned above.

Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT Blossoms
Author:
Daniel Livengood
MIT BLOSSOMS
Rhonda Jordan
Date Added:
06/02/2012
خصائص الغاز
Conditions of Use:
بلا تقييدات
Rating

قم بضخ جزيئات الغاز في صندوق وشاهد ما سيحدث عند تغيير الحجم، عند إضافة أو إزالة الحرارة وعند تغيير الجاذبية، وأكثر من ذلك. قم بقياس درجة الحرارة والضغط، واكتشف كيف تختلف خصائص الغاز في علاقتها ببعضها البعض.

نوع المادة:
محاكاة
Provider:
University of Colorado Boulder
Provider Set:
المحاكاة التفاعلية لموقع PhET
المؤلف:
Carl Wieman
Danielle Harlow
Jack Barbera
Kathy Perkins
Linda Koch
Michael Dubson
Ron LeMaster
Date Added:
10/05/2006
Is Bigger Better? A Look at a Selection Bias that Is All Around Us
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This learning video addresses a particular problem of selection bias, a statistical bias in which there is an error in choosing the individuals or groups to make broader inferences. Rather than delve into this broad topic via formal statistics, we investigate how it may appear in our everyday lives, sometimes distorting our perceptions of people, places and events, unless we are careful. When people are picked at random from two groups of different sizes, most of those selected usually come from the bigger group. That means we will hear more about the experience of the bigger group than that of the smaller one. This isn't always a bad thing, but it isn't always a good thing either. Because big groups ''speak louder,'' we have to be careful when we write mathematical formulas about what happened in the two groups. We think about this issue in this video, with examples that involve theaters, buses, and lemons. The prerequisite for this video lesson is a familiarity with algebra. It will take about one hour to complete, and the only materials needed are a blackboard and chalk.

Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT Blossoms
Author:
Anna Teytelman
Arnold Barnett
MIT BLOSSOMS
Date Added:
06/02/2012
Lunar Lander
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

Can you avoid the boulder field and land safely, just before your fuel runs out, as Neil Armstrong did in 1969? Our version of this classic video game accurately simulates the real motion of the lunar lander with the correct mass, thrust, fuel consumption rate, and lunar gravity. The real lunar lander is very hard to control.

Material Type:
Simulation
Provider:
University of Colorado Boulder
Provider Set:
PhET Interactive Simulations
Author:
Michael Dubson
Date Added:
01/26/2007
My Solar System
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

Build your own system of heavenly bodies and watch the gravitational ballet. With this orbit simulator, you can set initial positions, velocities, and masses of 2, 3, or 4 bodies, and then see them orbit each other.

Material Type:
Simulation
Provider:
University of Colorado Boulder
Provider Set:
PhET Interactive Simulations
Author:
Danielle Harlow
Michael Dubson
Mindy Gratny
Date Added:
11/15/2007
Using Geometry to Design Simple Machines
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This video is meant to be a fun, hands-on session that gets students to think hard about how machines work. It teaches them the connection between the geometry that they study and the kinematics that engineers use -- explaining that kinematics is simply geometry in motion. In this lesson, geometry will be used in a way that students are not used to. Materials necessary for the hands-on activities include two options: pegboard, nails/screws and a small saw; or colored construction paper, thumbtacks and scissors. Some in-class activities for the breaks between the video segments include: exploring the role of geometry in a slider-crank mechanism; determining at which point to locate a joint or bearing in a mechanism; recognizing useful mechanisms in the students' communities that employ the same guided motion they have been studying.

Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT Blossoms
Author:
Daniel D. Frey
MIT BLOSSOMS
Date Added:
06/02/2012