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  • CCSS: Mathematics
Estimating: Counting Trees
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CC BY-NC-ND
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This lesson unit is intended to help you assess how well students are able to: solve simple problems involving ratio and direct proportion; choose an appropriate sampling method; and collect discrete data and record them using a frequency table.

Material Type:
Assessment
Lecture Notes
Lesson Plan
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
Shell Center for Mathematical Education
U.C. Berkeley
Provider Set:
Mathematics Assessment Project (MAP)
Author:
http://map.mathshell.org/
Date Added:
04/26/2013
Is Bigger Better? A Look at a Selection Bias that Is All Around Us
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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This learning video addresses a particular problem of selection bias, a statistical bias in which there is an error in choosing the individuals or groups to make broader inferences. Rather than delve into this broad topic via formal statistics, we investigate how it may appear in our everyday lives, sometimes distorting our perceptions of people, places and events, unless we are careful. When people are picked at random from two groups of different sizes, most of those selected usually come from the bigger group. That means we will hear more about the experience of the bigger group than that of the smaller one. This isn't always a bad thing, but it isn't always a good thing either. Because big groups ''speak louder,'' we have to be careful when we write mathematical formulas about what happened in the two groups. We think about this issue in this video, with examples that involve theaters, buses, and lemons. The prerequisite for this video lesson is a familiarity with algebra. It will take about one hour to complete, and the only materials needed are a blackboard and chalk.

Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT Blossoms
Author:
Anna Teytelman
Arnold Barnett
MIT BLOSSOMS
Date Added:
06/02/2012
Taking Walks, Delivering Mail: An Introduction to Graph Theory
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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This learning video presents an introduction to graph theory through two fun, puzzle-like problems: ''The Seven Bridges of Konigsberg'' and ''The Chinese Postman Problem''. Any high school student in a college-preparatory math class should be able to participate in this lesson. Materials needed include: pen and paper for the students; if possible, printed-out copies of the graphs and image that are used in the module; and a blackboard or equivalent. During this video lesson, students will learn graph theory by finding a route through a city/town/village without crossing the same path twice. They will also learn to determine the length of the shortest route that covers all the roads in a city/town/village. To achieve these two learning objectives, they will use nodes and arcs to create a graph and represent a real problem.

Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT Blossoms
Author:
BLOSSOMS
Karima R. Nigmatulina
Date Added:
06/02/2012
Using Dimensions: Designing a Sports Bag
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-NC-ND
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This lesson unit is intended to help you assess how well students are able to: recognize and use common 2D representations of 3D objects and identify and use the appropriate formula for finding the circumference of a circle.

Material Type:
Assessment
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Shell Center for Mathematical Education
U.C. Berkeley
Provider Set:
Mathematics Assessment Project (MAP)
Author:
http://map.mathshell.org/
Date Added:
04/26/2013
Using Geometry to Design Simple Machines
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

This video is meant to be a fun, hands-on session that gets students to think hard about how machines work. It teaches them the connection between the geometry that they study and the kinematics that engineers use -- explaining that kinematics is simply geometry in motion. In this lesson, geometry will be used in a way that students are not used to. Materials necessary for the hands-on activities include two options: pegboard, nails/screws and a small saw; or colored construction paper, thumbtacks and scissors. Some in-class activities for the breaks between the video segments include: exploring the role of geometry in a slider-crank mechanism; determining at which point to locate a joint or bearing in a mechanism; recognizing useful mechanisms in the students' communities that employ the same guided motion they have been studying.

Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT Blossoms
Author:
Daniel D. Frey
MIT BLOSSOMS
Date Added:
06/02/2012