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Addition Patterns
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
3.0 stars

The purpose of this task is to study some patterns in a small addition table. Each pattern identified persists for a larger table and if more time is available for this activity students should be encouraged to explore these patterns in larger tables.

Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Illustrative Mathematics
Provider Set:
Illustrative Mathematics
Author:
Illustrative Mathematics
Date Added:
08/15/2012
Algebraic Equations, Inequalities, and Properties
Read the Fine Print
Rating
0.0 stars

This lesson is about trying to get students to make connections between ideas about equations, inequalities, and expressions. The lesson is designed to give students opportunities to use mathematical vocabulary for a purpose to describe, discuss, and work with these symbol strings.The idea is for students to start gathering global information by looking at the whole number string rather than thinking only about individual procedures or steps. Hopefully students will begin to see the symbol strings as mathematical objects with their own unique set of attributes. (7th Grade Math)

Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lecture
Lesson Plan
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
Noyce Foundation
Provider Set:
Inside Mathematics
Author:
Disston, Jacob
Date Added:
11/30/2011
Arithmetic (AR)
Read the Fine Print
Some Rights Reserved
Rating
0.0 stars

Remember your multiplication tables? ... me neither. Brush up on your multiplication, division, and factoring skills with this exciting game. No calculators allowed!

Material Type:
Simulation
Provider:
University of Colorado Boulder
Provider Set:
PhET Interactive Simulations
Author:
Michael Dubson
Trish Loeblein
Date Added:
05/02/2010
The Art of Approximation in Science and Engineering: How to Whip Out Answers Quickly
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

The purpose of this learning video is to show students how to think more freely about math and science problems. Sometimes getting an approximate answer in a much shorter period of time is well worth the time saved. This video explores techniques for making quick, back-of-the-envelope approximations that are not only surprisingly accurate, but are also illuminating for building intuition in understanding science. This video touches upon 10th-grade level Algebra I and first-year high school physics, but the concepts covered (velocity, distance, mass, etc) are basic enough that science-oriented younger students would understand. If desired, teachers may bring in pendula of various lengths, weights to hang, and a stopwatch to measure period. Examples of in- class exercises for between the video segments include: asking students to estimate 29 x 31 without a calculator or paper and pencil; and asking students how close they can get to a black hole without getting sucked in.

Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT Blossoms
Author:
Stephen M. Hou
Date Added:
06/02/2015
The Art of Approximation in Science and Engineering: How to Whip Out Answers Quickly
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

The purpose of this learning video is to show students how to think more freely about math and science problems. Sometimes getting an approximate answer in a much shorter period of time is well worth the time saved. This video explores techniques for making quick, back-of-the-envelope approximations that are not only surprisingly accurate, but are also illuminating for building intuition in understanding science. This video touches upon 10th-grade level Algebra I and first-year high school physics, but the concepts covered (velocity, distance, mass, etc) are basic enough that science-oriented younger students would understand. If desired, teachers may bring in pendula of various lengths, weights to hang, and a stopwatch to measure period. Examples of in- class exercises for between the video segments include: asking students to estimate 29 x 31 without a calculator or paper and pencil; and asking students how close they can get to a black hole without getting sucked in.

Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
MIT Learning International Networks Consortium
Provider Set:
M.I.T. Blossoms
Author:
Stephen M. Hou
Date Added:
06/02/2012
Developing a Sense of Scale
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-NC-ND
Rating
5.0 stars

This lesson unit is intended to help you assess whether students recognize relationships of direct proportion and how well they solve problems that involve proportional reasoning. In particular, it is intended to help you identify those students who: use inappropriate additive strategies in scaling problems, which have a multiplicative structure; rely on piecemeal and inefficient strategies such as doubling, halving, and decomposition, and have not developed a single multiplier strategy for solving proportionality problems; and see multiplication as making numbers bigger, and division as making numbers smaller.

Material Type:
Assessment
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Shell Center for Mathematical Education
Provider Set:
Mathematics Assessment Project (MAP)
Date Added:
04/26/2013
The Flaws of Averages
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

This learning video presents an introduction to the Flaws of Averages using three exciting examples: the ''crossing of the river'' example, the ''cookie'' example, and the ''dance class'' example. Averages are often worthwhile representations of a set of data by a single descriptive number. The objective of this module, however, is to simply point out a few pitfalls that could arise if one is not attentive to details when calculating and interpreting averages. The essential prerequisite knowledge for this video lesson is the ability to calculate an average from a set of numbers. During this video lesson, students will learn about three flaws of averages: (1) The average is not always a good description of the actual situation, (2) The function of the average is not always the same as the average of the function, and (3) The average depends on your perspective. To convey these concepts, the students are presented with the three real world examples mentioned above.

Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT Blossoms
Author:
Daniel Livengood
MIT BLOSSOMS
Rhonda Jordan
Date Added:
06/02/2012
Handy Measuring Ratio
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

In this activity, learners use their hands as tools for indirect measurement. Learners explore how to use ratios to calculate the approximate height of something that can't be measured directly by first measuring something that can be directly measured. This activity can also be used to explain how scientists use indirect measurement to determine distances between things in the universe that are too far away, too large or too small to measure directly (i.e. diameter of the moon or number of bacteria in a volume of liquid).

Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Exploratorium
Author:
Exploratorium
Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation
National Science Foundation
The Exploratorium
Date Added:
12/07/2010
Using Positive and Negative Numbers in Context
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-NC-ND
Rating
3.5 stars

This lesson unit is intended to help teachers assess how well students are able to understand and use directed numbers in context. It is intended to help identify and aid students who have difficulties in ordering, comparing, adding, and subtracting positive and negative integers. Particular attention is paid to the use of negative numbers on number lines to explore the structures: starting temperature + change in temperature = final temperature final temperature Đ change in temperature = starting temperature final temperature Đ starting temperature = change in temperature.

Material Type:
Assessment
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Shell Center for Mathematical Education
Provider Set:
Mathematics Assessment Project (MAP)
Date Added:
04/26/2013