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  • Physical Science
"Baseketball"
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
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This trick from Exploratorium physicist Paul Doherty lets you add together the bounces of two balls and send one ball flying. When we tried this trick on the Exploratorium's exhibit floor, we gathered a crowd of visitors who wanted to know what we were doing. We explained that we were engaged in serious scientific experimentation related to energy transfer. Some of them may have believed us. If you'd like to go into the physical calculations of this phenomenam, see the related resource "Bouncing Balls" - it's the same activity but with the math explained.

Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Exploratorium
Author:
Paul Doherty
The Exploratorium
Date Added:
11/07/2012
Experimenting with Symmetry
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
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In this activity, learners use pattern blocks and mirrors to explore symmetry. Learners work in pairs and build mirror images of each other's designs. In doing so, learners will examine principles of symmetry and reflection.

Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Exploratorium
Author:
Exploratorium
Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation
National Science Foundation
The Exploratorium
Date Added:
12/07/2010
Free Fall
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Remix and Share
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This video lesson is an example of ''teaching for understanding'' in lieu of providing students with formulas for determining the height of a dropped (or projected) object at any time during its fall. The concept presented here of creating a chart to organize and analyze data collected in a simple experiment is broadly useful. During the classroom breaks in this video, students will enjoy timing objects in free fall and balls rolling down ramps as a way of learning how to carefully conduct experiments and analyze the results. The beauty of this lesson is the simplicity of using only the time it takes for an object dropped from a measured height to strike the ground. There are no math prerequisites for this lesson and no needed supplies, other than a blackboard and chalk. It can be completed in one 50-60-minute classroom period.

Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
MIT Learning International Networks Consortium
Provider Set:
M.I.T. Blossoms
Author:
John Bookston
Date Added:
06/02/2012
I Spy Nano!
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
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In this game, learners try to find nano-related objects on a game board. Learners investigate the different ways nano is in the world around us.

Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Diagram/Illustration
Game
Reading
Provider:
Nanoscience Informal Science Education
Science and Math Informal Learning Educators (SMILE)
Provider Set:
NISE Network
SMILE Pathway: Science and Math Activities in One Search
Author:
Nanoscale Informal Science Education Network
National Science Foundation
NISE Network
Date Added:
01/02/2011
Inquiry: Using an Egg Drop Activity to Promote Critical Thinking and Analysis Skills
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In this hands-on inquiry activity, students will design and construct an apparatus that will permit an egg to survive a nine foot fall. Students are given limited materials, so they must critically think about the design and improvise strategies during the building of the apparatus

Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Science Education Resource Center (SERC) at Carleton College
Provider Set:
Pedagogy in Action
Author:
Seth Webster
Date Added:
12/09/2011
My Solar System
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

Build your own system of heavenly bodies and watch the gravitational ballet. With this orbit simulator, you can set initial positions, velocities, and masses of 2, 3, or 4 bodies, and then see them orbit each other.

Material Type:
Simulation
Provider:
University of Colorado Boulder
Provider Set:
PhET Interactive Simulations
Author:
Danielle Harlow
Michael Dubson
Mindy Gratny
Date Added:
11/15/2007
Scaling Cubes
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
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In this activity, learners explore scale by using building cubes to see how changing the length, width, and height of a three-dimensional object affects its surface area and its volume. Learners build bigger and bigger cubes to understand these scaling relationships.

Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Exploratorium
Author:
Exploratorium
Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation
National Science Foundation
The Exploratorium
Date Added:
12/07/2010
Scientific Processes
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

In this interactive activity adapted from NOVA, expand your understanding of the scientific process. Watch two videos featuring animations and interviews with scientists, and notice how the processes unfold and vary from one investigation to the other.

Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Interactive
Provider:
PBS LearningMedia
Provider Set:
PBS Learning Media Common Core Collection
Teachers' Domain
Author:
The Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation
The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation
WGBH Educational Foundation
Date Added:
08/01/2007
Your Age on Other Worlds
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
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Did you know that you would be a different age if you lived on Mars? It's true! In this activity, you'll learn about the different rotation and revolution periods of each of the planets and calculate your age respectively. Included is an astronomy history lesson and explanation of Kepler's Laws of Orbital Motion. The activity has a calculator built into the web page, but the activity can be made more math intensive by using the given data to calculate the learner's age by hand.

Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Exploratorium
Author:
Ron Hipschman
The Exploratorium
Date Added:
12/07/2000