Search Results (4)

View
Selected filters:
  • Sociology
Flu Math Games
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

This video lesson shows students that math can play a role in understanding how an infectious disease spreads and how it can be controlled. During this lesson, students will see and use both deterministic and probabilistic models and will learn by doing through role-playing exercises. The primary exercises between video segments of this lesson are class-intensive simulation games in which members of the class 'infect' each other under alternative math modeling assumptions about disease progression. Also there is an occasional class discussion and local discussion with nearby classmates.

Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT Blossoms
Author:
Mai Perches
Richard C. Larson
Sahar Hashmi
Date Added:
07/12/2014
Flu Math Games
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

This video lesson shows students that math can play a role in understanding how an infectious disease spreads and how it can be controlled. During this lesson, students will see and use both deterministic and probabilistic models and will learn by doing through role-playing exercises. The primary exercises between video segments of this lesson are class-intensive simulation games in which members of the class 'infect' each other under alternative math modeling assumptions about disease progression. Also there is an occasional class discussion and local discussion with nearby classmates.

Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
MIT Learning International Networks Consortium
Provider Set:
M.I.T. Blossoms
Author:
Mai Perches
Richard C. Larson
Sahar Hashmi
Date Added:
06/02/2012
Is Bigger Better? A Look at a Selection Bias that Is All Around Us
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

This learning video addresses a particular problem of selection bias, a statistical bias in which there is an error in choosing the individuals or groups to make broader inferences. Rather than delve into this broad topic via formal statistics, we investigate how it may appear in our everyday lives, sometimes distorting our perceptions of people, places and events, unless we are careful. When people are picked at random from two groups of different sizes, most of those selected usually come from the bigger group. That means we will hear more about the experience of the bigger group than that of the smaller one. This isn't always a bad thing, but it isn't always a good thing either. Because big groups ''speak louder,'' we have to be careful when we write mathematical formulas about what happened in the two groups. We think about this issue in this video, with examples that involve theaters, buses, and lemons. The prerequisite for this video lesson is a familiarity with algebra. It will take about one hour to complete, and the only materials needed are a blackboard and chalk.

Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT Blossoms
Author:
Anna Teytelman
Arnold Barnett
MIT BLOSSOMS
Date Added:
06/02/2012
Malala: Standing Up For Girls
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

This lesson focuses on the story of Malala Yousafzai, a 14-year-old Pakistani girl whose public stance in favor of the education of girls made her the target of a Taliban assassination attempt in October 2012. The lesson has students learn a little about Pakistan, and read and discuss Malala's blog. Because the context of the story is important and complex, background information is provided.

Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lecture
Lesson Plan
Simulation
Provider:
Morningside Center for Teaching Social Responsibility
Provider Set:
Teachable Moment
Date Added:
10/26/2012