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Ancient Civilizations of the World
Conditions of Use:
قراءة النص المطبوع بخط رفيع
Rating

In this course, the student will study the emergence of the major civilizations of the ancient world, beginning with the Paleolithic Era (about 2.5 million years ago) and finishing with the end of the Middle Ages in fifteenth century A.D. The student will pay special attention to how societies evolved across this expanse of time - from fragmented and primitive agricultural communities to more advanced and consolidated civilizations. By the end of the course, the student will possess a thorough understanding of important overarching social, political, religious, and economic themes in the ancient world, ranging from the emergence of Confucian philosophy in Asia to the fall of imperial Rome. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: Identify and define the world's earliest civilizations, including the Neolithic Revolution, and describe how it shaped the development of these early civilizations; Identify, describe, and compare/contrast the first advanced civilizations in the world - Mesopotamia and Egypt; Identify and describe the emergence of the earliest civilizations in Asia: the Harappan and Aryan societies on the Indian subcontinent and the Shang and Zhou societies in China; Identify and describe the emergence of new philosophies - Daoism and Confucianism - during the Warring States period in China. Identify and describe the subsequent rise of the Qin and Han dynasties; Identify and describe the different periods that characterized ancient Greece - Archaic Greece (or the Greek Dark Ages), classical Greece, and the Hellenistic era; Identify and describe the characteristics of the Roman Kingdom, the Roman Republic, and Imperial Rome; Analyze the emergence of the Mauryan and Gupta empires during the 'classical age' in India; Identify and analyze the Buddhist and Vedic (Hindu) faiths; Identify and describe the rise of civilizations in the Americas, particularly in Meso and South America; Analyze and describe the rise of Islam in the Middle East; Identify and describe the emergence of the Arab caliphate, the Umayyad dynasty, and Abbasid dynasty; Identify and describe the rise and fall of the Byzantine Empire; Identify and analyze key facets of medieval society in Western EuropeĺÎĺĚ_ĺÜthe Catholic Church, feudalism, and the rise of technology and commerce; Analyze and interpret primary-source documents that elucidate the exchanges and advancements made in civilizations across time and space. (History 101)

نوع المادة:
التقييم
المقرر التعليمي الكامل
Lecture
القراءة
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
11/21/2011
Art of the Islamic World
Conditions of Use:
قراءة النص المطبوع بخط رفيع
Rating

This course serves as an introduction to the pre-modern Islamic artistic traditions of the Mediterranean, Near East, and Central and South Asia. It surveys core Islamic beliefs, the basic characteristics of Islamic art and architecture, and art and architecture created under each dynasty and ruling party. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: identify the core beliefs of Islam, the major characteristics of Islamic art, and the major forms of Islamic architecture; identify major pre-modern Islamic works of art and monuments from the Middle East, Northern Africa, Spain, and South Asia; explain how the core beliefs of Islam contributed to the basic characteristics of Islamic art and architecture and the secular art works and architecture of the Islamic world; identify the succeeding dynasties that ruled the Islamic world; explain the important role that the patronage of art and architecture had played in definitions of kingship. (Art History 303)

نوع المادة:
التقييم
المقرر التعليمي الكامل
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
ملاحظات المحاضرة
القراءة
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
11/10/2011
Chatterbox and Family Literacy in Trinidad and Tobago
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

These modules are placed together to encourage dialogue among teachers about new ways to approach the study and teaching of Literacy. The hope is that the pragmatic slant described here will assist others in looking for "home-grown", workable approaches that could solve Literacy problems.

Material Type:
Full Course
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
Rice University
Provider Set:
Connexions
Author:
Barbara Joseph
Date Added:
02/16/2011
Empire and States in the Middle East and Southwest Asia
Conditions of Use:
قراءة النص المطبوع بخط رفيع
Rating

This course introduces the history of the Middle East and Southwest Asia from the pre-Islamic period to the end of World War I. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: discuss the history of East Asia from the pre-Islamic period through the beginning of the 20th century; analyze the interactions between ancient civilizations of the Middle East and Southwest Asia in the pre-Islamic period; identify the origins of Islam, and assess the political and cultural impact of the Muslim faith on the peoples of the Middle East and the Mediterranean Basin; identify the origins of the Umayyad and Abbasid Empires, and assess how these dynasties reshaped political and economic life throughout the Middle East and Southwest Asia; describe and assess the social and cultural impact of Islam on the peoples of the Middle East and the Mediterranean Basin; identify external threats to the Muslim world during the Middle Ages, and analyze how Muslim leaders responded to these threats; identify the origins of the Ottoman Empire, and assess how the Ottomans established political and economic control over the Eastern Mediterranean and the Middle East; analyze the political, economic, and military interactions between the Ottoman Empire and the nations of Europe in the 18th and 19th centuries; explain how European imperialism destabilized the Middle East and Southwest Asia in the 19th and early 20th centuries and allowed European nations to establish political control over many Middle Eastern nations; analyze the political impact of World War I on the peoples and nations of the Middle East; analyze and interpret primary source documents from the pre-Islamic period through the beginning of the 20th century using historical research methods. This free course may be completed online at any time. (History 231)

نوع المادة:
التقييم
المقرر التعليمي الكامل
Homework/Assignment
القراءة
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
04/16/2012
Foundations of Real World Math
Conditions of Use:
قراءة النص المطبوع بخط رفيع
Rating

In this course, you will cover some of the most basic math applications, like decimals, percents, and even fractions. You will not only learn the theory behind these topics, but also how to apply these concepts to your life. You will learn some basic mathematical properties, such as the reflexive property, associative property, and others. The best part is that you most likely already know them, even if you did not know the proper mathematical terminology.

نوع المادة:
Activity/Lab
المقرر التعليمي الكامل
Homework/Assignment
القراءة
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
08/28/2013
General Chemistry I
Conditions of Use:
قراءة النص المطبوع بخط رفيع
Rating

This survey chemistry course is designed to introduce students to the world of chemistry. In this course, we will study chemistry from the ground up, learning the basics of the atom and its behavior. We will apply this knowledge to understand the chemical properties of matter and the changes and reactions that take place in all types of matter. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: Define the general term 'chemistry.' Distinguish between the physical and chemical properties of matter. Distinguish between mixtures and pure substances. Describe the arrangement of the periodic table. Perform mathematical operations involving significant figures. Convert measurements into scientific notation. Explain the law of conservation of mass, the law of definite composition, and the law of multiple proportions. Summarize the essential points of Dalton's atomic theory. Define the term 'atom.' Describe electron configurations. Draw Lewis structures for molecules. Name ionic and covalent compounds using the rules for nomenclature of inorganic compounds. Explain the relationship between enthalpy change and a reaction's tendency to occur. (Chemistry 101; See also: Biology 105. Mechanical Engineering 004)

نوع المادة:
التقييم
المقرر التعليمي الكامل
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
ملاحظات المحاضرة
القراءة
Syllabus
Textbook
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
11/16/2011
هندسة الشكل
Conditions of Use:
قراءة النص المطبوع بخط رفيع
Rating

In this course, you will study the relationships between lines and angles. You will learn to calculate how much space an object covers, determine how much space is inside of a three-dimensional object, and other relationships between shapes, objects, and the mathematics that govern them.

نوع المادة:
Activity/Lab
المقرر التعليمي الكامل
Homework/Assignment
القراءة
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
08/28/2013
Islam, The Middle East, and The West
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

This course will introduce the student to the history of the Middle East from the rise of Islam to the twenty-first century. The course will emphasize the encounters and exchanges between the Islamic world and the West. By the end of the course, the student will understand how Islam became a sophisticated and far-reaching civilization and how conflicts with the West shaped the development of the Middle East from the medieval period to the present day. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: identify and describe the nature of pre-Islamic society, culture, and religion. They will also be able to describe the subsequent rise of the prophet Muhammad and his monotheistic religion, Islam; identify and describe the elements of Islamic law, religious texts and practices, and belief systems; identify and describe the rise of the Umayyad and Abbasid dynasties in the Middle East. Students will also be able to compare and contrast the two empires; identify and describe the emergence of the Umayyad dynasty in Spain. Students will also be able to analyze the conflicts between Muslims and Christians on the Iberian Peninsula; identify and describe the Crusades. They will be able to describe both Muslim and Christian perceptions of the holy wars; identify and describe the impact of the Mongol invasions on the Middle East; compare and contrast the Ottoman and Safavid empires; analyze the decline of the Ottoman Empire and the beginning of European imperialism/domination of the Middle East in the 1800s; identify and describe how and why European powers garnered increased spheres of influence after the collapse of the Ottoman Empire and the end of World War I; analyze and describe the rise of resistance and independence movements in the Middle East; identify and describe the rise of Islamic nationalism and the emergence of violent anti-Western sentiment; analyze (and synthesize) the relationship between the Middle East and the West between the 600s and the present day; analyze and interpret primary source documents that elucidate the exchanges and conflicts between the Islamic world and the West over time. (History 351)

Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Textbook
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
11/21/2011
Measurement & Experimentation Laboratory
Conditions of Use:
قراءة النص المطبوع بخط رفيع
Rating

This course serves as an introduction to working in an engineering laboratory. The student will learn to gather, analyze, interpret, and explain physical measurements for simple engineering systems in which only a few factors need be considered. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: Interpret and use scientific notation and engineering units to describe physical quantities; Present engineering data and other information in graphical and/or tabular format; Use automated systems for data acquisition and analysis for engineering systems; Work in teams for experiment design, data acquisition, and data analysis; Use elementary concepts of physics to analyze engineering situations and data; Summarize and present experimental design, implementation, and data in written format; Use new technology and resources to design and perform experiments for engineering analysis. (Mechanical Engineering 301)

نوع المادة:
المقرر التعليمي الكامل
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
11/16/2011
Mechatronics
Conditions of Use:
قراءة النص المطبوع بخط رفيع
Rating

Examination of Mechatronics, including the integration of mechanics, electronics, signal processing, and control systems, signal amplification, data sampling and filtering, machine programming, actuator and motor control, sensors and robotics.

نوع المادة:
المقرر التعليمي الكامل
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
08/28/2013
Modern Middle East and Southwest Asia
Conditions of Use:
قراءة النص المطبوع بخط رفيع
Rating

This course will introduce the student to the history of the nations and peoples of the Middle East and Southwest Asia from 1919 to the present. The course covers the major political, economic, and social changes that took place throughout the region during this 100-year period. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: Identify and explain major political, social and economic trends, events, and people in history of the Middle East and Southwest Asia from the beginning of the 20th century to the present; Explain how the countries of the region have overcome significant social, economic, and political problems as they have grown from weak former colonies into modern nation-states; Identify and explain the emergence of nationalist movements following World War I, European political and economic imperialism during the first half of the 20th century, the creation of the nation of Israel, regional economic development, and the impact of secular and religious trends on Middle Eastern society and culture during the second half of the 20th century; Identify and explain the important economic, political, and social developments in the Middle East and Southwest Asia during the twentieth and twenty-first centuries; Analyze and interpret primary source documents from the 20th and 21st centuries that illustrate important overarching political, economic, and social themes. (History 232)

نوع المادة:
التقييم
المقرر التعليمي الكامل
Lecture
القراءة
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
11/21/2011
Precalculus I
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

Precalculus I is designed to prepare you for Precalculus II, Calculus, Physics, and higher math and science courses. In this course, the main focus is on five types of functions: linear, polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic. In accompaniment with these functions, you will learn how to solve equations and inequalities, graph, find domains and ranges, combine functions, and solve a multitude of real-world applications.

Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
08/28/2013
Precalculus II
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

This course begins by establishing the definitions of the basic trig functions and exploring their properties, and then proceeds to use the basic definitions of the functions to study the properties of their graphs, including domain and range, and to define the inverses of these functions and establish the their properties. Through the language of transformation, the student will explore the ideas of period and amplitude and learn how these graphical differences relate to algebraic changes in the function formulas. The student will also learn to solve equations, prove identities using the trig functions, and study several applications of these functions. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: measure angles in degrees and radians, and relate them to arc length; solve problems involving right triangles and unit circles using the definitions of the trigonometric functions; solve problems involving non-right triangles; relate the equation of a trigonometric function to its graph; solve trigonometric equations using inverse trig functions; prove trigonometric identities; solve trig equations involving identities; relate coordinates and equations in Polar form to coordinates and equations in Cartesian form; perform operations with vectors and use them to solve problems; relate equations and graphs in Parametric form to equations and graphs in Cartesian form; link graphical, numeric, and symbolic approaches when interpreting situations and analyzing problems; write clear, correct, and complete solutions to mathematical problems using proper mathematical notation and appropriate language; communicate the difference between an exact and an approximate solution and determine which is more appropriate for a given problem. This free course may be completed online at any time. It has been developed through a partnership with the Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges; the Saylor Foundation has modified some WSBCTC materials. (Mathematics 003)

Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
04/16/2012
The Silk Road and Central Eurasia
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

This course will introduce the student to the history of Central Eurasia and the Silk Road from 4500 B.C.E to the nineteenth century. The student will learn about the culture of the nomadic peoples of Central Eurasia as well as the development of the Silk Road. By the end of the course, the student will understand how the Silk Road influenced the development of nomadic societies in Central Eurasia as well as powerful empires in China, the Middle East, and Europe. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: identify and describe the emergence of early nomadic cultures in Central Eurasia; identify and describe the rise of silk production in China; identify and describe the various routes of the Silk Road; identify and describe the reasons for China's opening of the Silk Road in the second century; identify and describe Han China's political and commercial relationships with nomadic tribes in Central Eurasia; identify and describe the impact of the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire on the Silk Road; describe and analyze the 'golden age' of the Silk Road; identify and describe the impact of the Mongol Empire on Silk Road cultures; identify and describe the transmission of art, religion, and technology via the Silk Road; analyze and describe the arrival of European traders and explorers seeking a 'new' silk route in the 1400s; identify and describe the 'Great Game' rivalry between China, Britain, and Russia in Central Eurasia in the nineteenth century; analyze and interpret primary source documents that elucidate political, economic, and cultural exchange along the Silk Road. (History 341)

Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Reading
Syllabus
Textbook
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
11/21/2011
Single-Variable Calculus I
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

This course is designed to introduce the student to the study of Calculus through concrete applications. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: Define and identify functions; Define and identify the domain, range, and graph of a function; Define and identify one-to-one, onto, and linear functions; Analyze and graph transformations of functions, such as shifts and dilations, and compositions of functions; Characterize, compute, and graph inverse functions; Graph and describe exponential and logarithmic functions; Define and calculate limits and one-sided limits; Identify vertical asymptotes; Define continuity and determine whether a function is continuous; State and apply the Intermediate Value Theorem; State the Squeeze Theorem and use it to calculate limits; Calculate limits at infinity and identify horizontal asymptotes; Calculate limits of rational and radical functions; State the epsilon-delta definition of a limit and use it in simple situations to show a limit exists; Draw a diagram to explain the tangent-line problem; State several different versions of the limit definition of the derivative, and use multiple notations for the derivative; Understand the derivative as a rate of change, and give some examples of its application, such as velocity; Calculate simple derivatives using the limit definition; Use the power, product, quotient, and chain rules to calculate derivatives; Use implicit differentiation to find derivatives; Find derivatives of inverse functions; Find derivatives of trigonometric, exponential, logarithmic, and inverse trigonometric functions; Solve problems involving rectilinear motion using derivatives; Solve problems involving related rates; Define local and absolute extrema; Use critical points to find local extrema; Use the first and second derivative tests to find intervals of increase and decrease and to find information about concavity and inflection points; Sketch functions using information from the first and second derivative tests; Use the first and second derivative tests to solve optimization (maximum/minimum value) problems; State and apply Rolle's Theorem and the Mean Value Theorem; Explain the meaning of linear approximations and differentials with a sketch; Use linear approximation to solve problems in applications; State and apply L'Hopital's Rule for indeterminate forms; Explain Newton's method using an illustration; Execute several steps of Newton's method and use it to approximate solutions to a root-finding problem; Define antiderivatives and the indefinite integral; State the properties of the indefinite integral; Relate the definite integral to the initial value problem and the area problem; Set up and calculate a Riemann sum; Estimate the area under a curve numerically using the Midpoint Rule; State the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus and use it to calculate definite integrals; State and apply basic properties of the definite integral; Use substitution to compute definite integrals. (Mathematics 101; See also: Biology 103, Chemistry 003, Computer Science 103, Economics 103, Mechanical Engineering 001)

Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Reading
Syllabus
Textbook
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
11/11/2011
Thermal-Fluid Systems
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

This course deals with the transfer of work, energy, and material via gases and liquids. These fluids may undergo changes in temperature, pressure, density, and chemical composition during the transfer process and may act on or be acted on by external systems. Engineers must fully understand these processes in order to analyze, troubleshoot, or improve existing processes and/or innovate and design new ones. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: Interpret and use scientific notation and engineering units for the description of fluid flow and energy transfer; Interpret measurements of thermodynamic quantities for description of fluid flow and energy transfer; Use concepts of continuum fluid dynamics to interpret physical situations; Determine the interrelationship of variables in pumping and piping operations; Analyze heat-exchanger performance and understand design considerations; Apply thermodynamics to the analysis of energy conversion and cooling/heating situations; Communicate technical information in written and graphical form. (Mechanical Engineering 303)

Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
11/16/2011